Who do Afghan women hate more, their tormenters or their rescuers?

In 1999, a mother of seven was executed in front of 30,000 spectators in Kabul’s Ghazi Sport stadium for allegedly murdering her abusive husband (see right). She was imprisoned for three years and extensively tortured prior to the execution, yet she refused to plead her innocence in a bid to protect her daughter (reportedly the actual culprit). Wikipedia.

Wow, if you believe this report from the Asian Sentinel, Afghan women, haven’t been exactly throwing daisies at the feet of the rescuers who unshackled them from the Taliban reign of terror.

When asking for Afghan women's opinion on whether there should be negotiations with the Taliban and foreign troop withdrawal, Wazhma Frogh, a leading women's activist and an executive board member of the Afghan Women's Network, told me that among Afghan women there is no clear consensus. But there is a common call for ending all forms of violence.

I found this paragraph mind-boggling:

Wazhma says it doesn't matter to a mother whether an international air operation or a suicide bomber killed her child. The pain of loss is the same and she must endure her suffering under cover and in silence.

Methinks we’re not exactly witnessing a resurgence of the Glorious French Resistance here, headed up by Joan of Ark, Princess Leia, and Sophie Scholl. On the other hand, Wazhma, whoever she is, may just be one craven voice who needs to speak for herself. I hope so.

It’s disturbing though. A little gratitude would be nice for a change. Especially since the article also says that Afghan women fear a resurgence of the Taliban after the draw-down of U.S. troops next year — even while some say that they equate the U.S. with the Taliban because their rescue wasn’t accomplished in a sufficiently tidy and angst-free environment.

The report Wednesday from Washington, DC   that US President Barack Obama has set in motion a substantial withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is hardly good news for Afghanistan’s women.  Withdrawal of 10,000 NATO troops is expected by the end of the year. Women in the country are hearing rumors that talks with the Taliban are already taking place in secret.

This is alarming. Without the representation and participation of women there can be no assurance that their rights will be upheld after the peace process and that could spell disaster. Women risk losing liberty, education and employment if the fundamentalist Taliban were to win a significant place in the Afghan government.

Why? If Wazhma really was speaking for all Afghan women, and they really do regard the allied forces that routed their tormenters and broke their shackles with the same contempt as the Taliban itself, what have they got to lose?

Honestly, it makes me wonder if these gals have the fortitude and courage to maintain their own liberty, when they don’t appear to have any will to fight for it in the first place, and instead sit around and primly call for an “end to all violence.”

Funny, I don’t think anyone said that when General MacArthur famously returned to the Red Beach in Leyte or the 4th Infantry Division rolled into Paris.

The Taliban burned; shot; stoned; cut off ears, noses, and other body parts; and oppressed, terrorized, and imprisoned them – among other things – but on the other hand the allied forces didn’t “appear to take enough care when launching attacks.” Tomato, tomahto. I think there’s plenty of guilt to go around here, don’t you?

Gak.

This is astounding, especially when you consider this partial list of the Taliban’s offenses against women while they were in control of Afghanistan:

  • In October 1996, a woman had the tip of her thumb cut off for wearing nail varnish.
  • In December 1996, Radio Shari’a announced that 225 Kabul women had been seized and punished for violating the sharia code of dress. The sentence was handed down by a tribunal and the women were lashed on their legs and backs for their misdemeanor.
  • In May 1997, five female CARE International employees with authorisation from the Ministry of the Interior to conduct research for an emergency feeding programme were forced from their vehicle by members of the religious police. The guards used a public address system to insult and harass the women before striking them with a metal and leather whip over 1.5 meters (almost 5 feet) in length.
  • In 1999, a mother of seven was executed in front of 30,000 spectators in Kabul’s Ghazi Sport stadium for allegedly murdering her abusive husband (see right). She was imprisoned for three years and extensively tortured prior to the execution, yet she refused to plead her innocence in a bid to protect her daughter (reportedly the actual culprit).
  • When a Taliban raid discovered a woman running an informal school in her apartment, they beat the children and threw the woman down a flight of stairs (breaking her leg), and then imprisoned her. They threatened to stone her family publicly if she refused to sign a declaration of loyalty to the Taliban and their laws.
  • An Afghan girl named Bibi Aisha was promised to a new family through a tribal method of solving disputes known as baad. When she fled the violence girls often suffer under baad, her new family found her and a Taliban commander ordered her punished as an example, "lest other girls in the village try to do the same thing". Her ears and nose were cut off and she was left for dead in the mountains, but survived.
  • Schoolgirls, women, teachers and schools have been and continue to be attacked by arsonists in acid attacks by Taliban members. Unicef said there were 236 school-related attacks in Afghanistan in 2007.
  • In August 2010 it was revealed through blood tests that a mysterious series of cases of mass sickness at girls’ schools across the country over the last two years were caused by a powerful poison gas.
  • Working women are threatened into quitting their jobs. Failure to comply with Taliban's threats has led to women being shot and killed as in the case of 22-year old Hossai in July 2010.

Hat tip to Gateway Pundit

 

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